The Past, Present & Future of Naltrexone: An Expert Discussion

Oar Health Editorial Team

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Dec 05, 2023

Female doctor making notes at desk in front of computer

Naltrexone has been approved for the treatment of alcohol problems since 1994. But it is prescribed to less than 3% of people with Alcohol Use Disorder.

In this panel discussion, leading experts explain the research that proved naltrexone helps people drink less or quit and describe the barriers to its adoption.

They also answer common questions about naltrexone — how it works, when to take it, how to manage side effects, and how to work with your healthcare professional to get the best results from the medication.

Panelists include:

· Dr. Joseph Volpicelli, M.D., Ph.D., Executive Director of The Institute of Addiction Medicine and Medical Director at the Volpicelli Center

· Percy Menzies, President of Assisted Recovery Centers of America

· Dr. Joshua D. Lee, M.D., Professor of Population Health and Medicine at the NYU Grossman School of Medicine and Chief Clinical Adviser to Oar Health

The panel is moderated by Jonathan Hunt-Glassman, Oar Health CEO.

About The Author

Oar is a telemedicine platform that makes science-backed, medication-assisted addiction treatment approachable and accessible for millions of consumers who feel excluded by the current treatment landscape and who may have a wide range of goals, from moderation to abstinence.

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  • How It Works
  • Naltrexone
  • Medical Experts
  • FAQ
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  • ¹ Oar Health membership plans include access to the Oar Health platform, virtual consultations with a healthcare professional, and medication if prescribed. Annual membership plan costs $468, equating to $39/mo.
  • ² Self-reported by members after 6 months of Oar Health membership
  • ³ Verywell Health survey of Oar Health members, published March, 2023
  • ⁴ Prescription medication is available only if prescribed by a licensed clinician
Naltrexone is a prescription medication used to treat alcohol dependence. It is available only if prescribed by a healthcare provider. You should not take naltrexone if you use opioids, including prescription drugs or street drugs that contain opioids, as naltrexone can cause sudden opioid withdrawal. Common side effects of naltrexone include nausea, sleepiness, headache, dizziness, vomiting, decreased appetite, painful joints, muscle cramps, and trouble sleeping. These are not all of the side effects of naltrexone. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effects that bother you or do not go away.
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